Archive for ‘Quote’

February 7, 2015

Ted Bundys last interview, an innocent deception

“I had asked Ted to do me one favor, as his lawyer, and to not discuss the Florida crimes, just in case we got a stay of execution at the very last minute. On the tape, Dobson asks him about the murder of Kimberly Leach. Ted hesitates and glances around, deciding what to do. I love that moment. I love to see Ted struggling with my instructions, deciding whether to restrain himself or do as he pleases, assert control. He finally chokes out that he can’t talk about it, though he’d like to.

That few seconds of film is Ted’s gift to me. The Reverend Dobson interprets his hesitation as overwhelming remorse.

That was my gift to Ted.”

Nelson, Polly. Defending the Devil: My Story as Ted Bundy’s Last Lawyer. 1st ed. New York: W. Morrow, 1994. Print.

January 31, 2015

“Ted was a very sensitive person.”

“It was important to be popular. We’d be standing in the hallway and someone would come up to me and say, ‘Hey, we’re going to have a party Friday. Can you come over?’ Ted would be standing there and he wouldn’t be asked. It wasn’t that he was singled out for ridicule, but you have to remember that Ted was a very sensitive person – very sensitive.”

Terry Storwick, school friend

January 23, 2015

“..so much of what I wanted.”

“I was waiting for the bus in the Omni, watching a convention on the main floor there. There were all these people going to a Hawks game. And I was watching these people – these people who had real lives, backgrounds, histories, girl friends, husbands and families. Who were smiling and laughing and talking with each other. Who seemed to have so much of what I wanted! All of a sudden, I felt smaller and smaller and smaller. More insecure. And more alone! Bit by bit by bit, I felt something drain out of me.”

January 21, 2015

“It was just so good not to be looked at differently.”

Ted began crying during his description of those first days when he had returned to the world outside a prison.

“There’s something I’ve noticed since I’ve been talking to you here this morning,” Bodiford gently inserted. “When you start thinking about certain things, certain places, you start crying. What is it that disturbs you so much when you start talking about watching people play racquetball?”

“It wasn’t racquetball or anything in particular about racquetball, I don’t know…well…hold the phone….It may be tearful, but not sobbing or crying or anything. It was just so good to be around people, just so good to be a part of people, not to be looked at differently.”

January 21, 2015

Ted Bundy, on women

“I admit to being dependent on women, for whatever that means. I don’t know that there’s a man in the courtroom who isn’t, and if he isn’t, maybe there’s something wrong with him.”

October 3, 2014

Ted Bundy, on possession

“He received no pleasure from harming or causing pain to the person he attacked. He received absolutely no gratification. He did everything possible within reason – considering the unreasonableness of the situation – not to torture these individuals, at least not physically. The fantasy that accompanies and generates the anticipation that precedes the crime is always more stimulating than the immediate aftermath of the crime itself. He should have recognized that what really fascinated him was the hunt, the adventure of searching out his victims. And, to a degree, possessing them physically as one would possess a potted plant, a painting, or a Porsche. Owning, as it were, this individual.”

the woman and the potted plant

September 18, 2014

Ted Bundy, on guilt

“A lot of people are encumbered with a kind of mechanism that is called guilt. To a degree, I have certainly experienced it, but much less so now than ever while I was on the streets. Or even two years ago.

I mean I don’t feel guilty for anything. I feel less guilty now than I’ve felt in any time in my life. About anything. And it’s not that I’ve forgotten anything, or else closed down part of my mind, or compartmentalized. I compartmentalize less now than I ever have. It’s just done. It’s back there in the mists. I say “mists” because I don’t think anyone actually touches the past the way they can touch the present or the future.

Guilt? It’s this mechanism we use to control people. It’s an illusion. It’s a kind of social control mechanism – and it’s very unhealthy. It does terrible things to our bodies. And there are much better ways to control our behavior than that rather extraordinary use of guilt. It doesn’t solve anything, necessarily. It’s just a very gross technique we impose upon ourselves to control the people, groups of people.

I guess I am in the enviable position of not having to deal with guilt. There’s just no reason for it. I don’t think I need to feel guilty anymore, because I try to do what’s right, right now. And that’s it!

Now, some people could listen to what I just said and say, ‘See, he’s a sociopath,’ or whatever term they use. ‘He doesn’t feel any guilt. Oh, how terrible! He doesn’t feel any guilt!’ Ha!

I feel sorry for people who feel guilt. I’m not talking about the act. I’m talking about the emotional consequences of the act. I feel sorry for people who are drug addicts or who are criminals. I feel sorry for business executives who have to lust after money and power. I feel sorry for a lot of people who have to do things that hurt them. But I don’t feel sorry for anyone who doesn’t feel guilty because the guilt doesn’t solve anything, really. It hurts you.”

March 28, 2014

“..I’m more.”

I'm more

“I’ve got to show them that I can stand up in a court of law and run these people ragged. That I’m not a fiend, necessarily. That’s not all there is to me. I’ve got to show them that I’m more. That’s really important to me, that I’m more.”

February 14, 2014

“..Even Ted Bundy’s life.”

ted-bundy-life-quote

February 2, 2014

“I hope you liked me.”

He asked that I use our interviews to help explain him to others, to explain that he was not a monster. He stared into my eyes and finally asked a question that was obviously very important to him:

“I need to know. Did you and Jim like me?” My heart dropped.
“Of course, Ted, of course.” I tried to push those words into Ted’s heart and allow him to believe it, as he apparently did not. I didn’t care what the truth was.

ted bundy with bill hagmaier before execution white shirt (3)

When I returned to Ted, he held a letter against the glass that he had written to me and Jim, thanking us for our representation. “I hope you liked me,” it said. “I hope this wasn’t just an unpleasant legal chore for you.” His note ended with, “I feel close to you now.”

Nelson, Polly. Defending the Devil: My Story as Ted Bundy’s Last Lawyer. 1st ed. New York: W. Morrow, 1994. Print.

January 4, 2014

“He was a real man..”

ted bundy young dapper handsome in suit

“In my mind the very point of this work was that all human life was sacred, without judgment or distinction, and that it was the truly heinous cases that tested whether we as people and as a society really meant that. Furthermore, Ted Bundy was not a symbol, a metaphor, a cardboard cutout. He was a real man, captive and rendered harmless at present, made of flesh and blood.”

Nelson, Polly. Defending the Devil: My Story as Ted Bundy’s Last Lawyer. 1st ed. New York: W. Morrow, 1994. Print.

December 21, 2013

Ted speaks from beyond the grave..

vlcsnap-2013-12-21-18h39m09s231

“I don’t like people walking around and ogling me like I’m some sort of weirdo, because I’m not.”